How Exactly Do Immigration Bonds Work?

October 12, 2017

Immigration is one of the hottest issues facing America today. While some may not be naturalized citizens, it is important to understand that immigrants still have rights.

One of those rights is to secure the release of a friend or family member detained by the United States Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

According to Syracuse University, the average time to process an immigration case is nearly 600 days. Posting an immigration bond can alleviate the burden this extended detention places on individuals and their families.

Read on to learn more about immigration bonds and how they work.

What are Immigration Bonds?

An immigration bond is paid to the United States government to secure the release of a detained immigrant. The stated purpose of an immigration bond is to encourage attendance at a future court date.

Remember, the collateral is returned at the end of the immigration case.

What Type of Bonds are Available to Immigrants

The bond discussed above is commonly referred to as a delivery bond. Bond payment guarantees the release of the detainee and gives them an opportunity to seek legal consultation prior to the immigration case.

There is another less favorable option. Detainees can agree to a voluntary departure bond, in which they agree to leave the United States within a certain period of time.

In this scenario, the detainee provides the judge with a guarantee to depart the country. Failing to comply with the voluntary departure order can result in additional legal consequences.

Who Can Post a Delivery Bond?

Only a green card holder or United States citizen can post an immigration bond. This is a requirement imposed by the U.S. government.

Detainees should give this responsibility to a close family member or friend. When the case concludes, the collateral will be returned to this person.

The only way to recoup any personal investment is by collecting from this person. You must ensure that you trust this person completely.

How Much does a Delivery Bond Cost?

The cost of an immigration bond has skyrocketed over the past few decades. In the mid-1990s, an immigration bond cost roughly $2,500.

Twenty years later, it now costs an average of $8,000 or more. Furthermore, the number of bonds in excess of $25,000 is on the rise.

The bond amount is subjective and determined by the judge. A variety of factors are taken into consideration. These variables include the detainee's criminal history, risk of flight, and associations within the community.

ICE has yet to provide an explanation for the dramatic increase in bond price.

Detention in an ICE facility can be a difficult experience. The best course of action is to post immigration bonds.

This will allow you to make arrangements with family and seek out legal consultation. If you have any questions about the bond process for immigrants, please do not hesitate to contact us for additional guidance.

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